Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

Chapter 13 Bankruptcy offers individuals a number of advantages over liquidation under Chapter 7. Chapter 13 can be a good solution for people who need time to pay off certain debts and who have enough income to meet the Chapter 13 requirements. This particular type of bankruptcy can also protect third-parties (“co-signers”) who are liable with the debtor on consumer debts.

Can I save my Home?

If you are facing foreclosure on your home, Chapter 13 provides a powerful remedy. You can keep your home by proposing a feasible repayment plan that includes your missed payments, as long as you stay current on your mortgage.

Can I Keep my Assets?

In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you get to keep all of your property regardless of its value, so long as you are able to pay your unsecured debtors the value of the property you would lose if you filed for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy.

Qualifications for a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you get to keep all of your property regardless of its value, so long as you are able to pay your unsecured debtors the value of the property you would lose if you filed for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy.

How do I get Started

The first step in determining whether filing bankruptcy is an appropriate option for you is to schedule a free consultation. We will go over your financial situation in detail and discuss the various options available.

How it Works

A chapter 13 case begins by filing a petition with the bankruptcy court serving the area where the debtor has a domicile or residence. Unless the court orders otherwise, the debtor must also file with the court:  (1) schedules of assets and liabilities; (2) a schedule of current income and expenditures; (3) a schedule of executory contracts and unexpired leases; and (4) a statement of financial affairs. Fed. R. Bankr. P. 1007(b). The debtor must also file a certificate of credit counseling and a copy of any debt repayment plan developed through credit counseling; evidence of payment from employers, if any, received 60 days before filing; a statement of monthly net income and any anticipated increase in income or expenses after filing; and a record of any interest the debtor has in federal or state qualified education or tuition accounts. 11 U.S.C. § 521. The debtor must provide the chapter 13 case trustee with a copy of the tax return or transcripts for the most recent tax year as well as tax returns filed during the case (including tax returns for prior years that had not been filed when the case began). Id. A husband and wife may file a joint petition or individual petitions.

In order to complete the Official Bankruptcy Forms that make up the petition, statement of financial affairs, and schedules, the debtor must compile the following information:

  1. A list of all creditors and the amounts and nature of their claims;
  2. The source, amount, and frequency of the debtor’s income;
  3. A list of all of the debtor’s property; and
  4. A detailed list of the debtor’s monthly living expenses, i.e., food, clothing, shelter, utilities, taxes, transportation, medicine, etc.

Individuals may use a chapter 13 proceeding to save their home from foreclosure. The automatic stay stops the foreclosure proceeding as soon as the individual files the chapter 13 petition. The individual may then bring the past-due payments current over a reasonable period of time. Nevertheless, the debtor may still lose the home if the mortgage company completes the foreclosure sale under state law before the debtor files the petition.11 U.S.C. § 1322(c). The debtor may also lose the home if he or she fails to make the regular mortgage payments that come due after the chapter 13 filing.

Between 20 and 50 days after the debtor files the chapter 13 petition, the chapter 13 trustee will hold a meeting of creditors. If the U.S. trustee or bankruptcy administrator schedules the meeting at a place that does not have regular U.S. trustee or bankruptcy administrator staffing, the meeting may be held no more than 60 days after the debtor files. Fed. R. Bankr. P. 2003(a). During this meeting, the trustee places the debtor under oath, and both the trustee and creditors may ask questions. The debtor must attend the meeting and answer questions regarding his or her financial affairs and the proposed terms of the plan.11 U.S.C. § 343.Generally, the debtor can avoid problems by making sure that the petition and plan are complete and accurate, and by consulting with an attorney.

After the meeting of creditors, the debtor, the chapter 13 trustee, and those creditors who wish to attend will come to court for a hearing on the debtor’s chapter 13 repayment plan.

The discharge in a chapter 13 case is somewhat broader than in a chapter 7 case. Debts dischargable in a chapter 13, but not in chapter 7, include debts for willful and malicious injury to property (as opposed to a person), debts incurred to pay nondischargeable tax obligations, and debts arising from property settlements in divorce or separation proceedings. 11 U.S.C. § 1328(a).

We can help you to get debt relief. Contact us to find out if you are eligible for bankruptcy relief. We provide you with answers to general about debt relief or how our services work. Contact us by phone at (801) 432-8682.

We serve all of Utah